BOOKS
21st Century Irish Paganism: Worldview, Ritual, Identity  (Forthcoming from Routledge)
ISBN: 978-1-4724-7209-0
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EDITED BOOKS & JOURNALS

Editor. The Twin Peaks Phenomenon: Essays on a show both Wonderful and Strange (Forthcoming from McFarland)


Editor. Folk Metal: Critical Essays on Identity, Myth and Culture (Forthcoming from Palgrave Macmillan)


Poster designed by Louise Milne

(2017) Co-editor with James Kapaló. Incantatio, An International Journal on Charms, Charmers and Charming Volume 6:
http://www.folklore.ee/incantatio/Incantatio2017_6.pdf

(2017) Co-editor with James Kapaló and Chris Heinhold,
Journal of the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions, Volume 5.

(2016) Co-editor with James Kapaló and Yafa Shanneik, Journal of the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions, Volume 3. Special Issue: Festschrift in Honour of Professor Brian Bocking

 

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(2009) Guest Editor. Cosmos 25/ The Ritual Year 4: The Ritual Year and Gender, proceedings of the fourth SIEF Ritual Year Working Group Conference. The volume was produced as a special issue of the international peer-reviewed journal Cosmos: The Journal of the Traditional Cosmology Society

ritual year and gender

 
(2006) Co-editor with Helga Einarsdóttir and Seán Ó Duinnshléibhe. Béascna UCC Journal of Folklore and Ethnology, Vol. 3

beascna 2



(2003) Co-editor with Aiveen Cleary, Valérie Liégeois and Seán Ó Duinnshléibhe. Béascna UCC Journal of Folklore and Ethnology, Vol. 2.

 

Book Chapters
  • (2022) 'Esotericism, Romantic Nationalism and the Birth of the Irish State' In O'Brien, Hazel and Brendan McNamara (eds.), The Study of Religions in Ireland: Past, Present and Future, pp. 77-89. London: Bloomsbury.
     
  • (2021) ‘Brigit, Goddess and Saint, and Traditions of Birth’ In Ryan, Salvador (ed.), Birth and the Irish: A Miscellany, pp. 11-14. Dublin: Wordwell.
     
  • (2020) 'Entering the Magic Mists: Irish Contemporary Paganism, Celticity and Indigeneity' In Harvey, Graham (ed.), Indigenizing Movements in Europe, pp. 13-30. Sheffield, Equinox.
     
  • (2019) ‘The Nearest Kin of the Moon: Irish Pagan Witchcraft, Magic(k), and the Celtic Twilight’ In Doyle White, Ethan and Feraro, Shai (eds.), Magic and Witchery in the Modern West: Celebrating the Twentieth Anniversary of Ronald Hutton’s The Triumph of the Moon, pp. 85-106. Cham, Palgrave McMillan. Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic.
     
  • (2019) ‘Marriage Divination’ In Ryan, Salvador (ed.). Marriage and the Irish: A Miscellany, pp. 207-210. Dublin: Wordwell.
     
  • (2017) ‘The Sídhe and Fairy Forts’ In Young, Simon and Houlbrook, Ceri (eds.). Magical Folk: British and Irish Fairies 500 AD  to the Present, pp. 95-107. London: Gibson Square.
     
  • (2016) ‘Death and Dying in Contemporary Irish Pagan Cosmology’ In Ryan, Salvador (ed.). Death and the Irish: A Miscellany. Dublin: Wordwell (In Press).
     
  • (2016) ‘The Ritual and Social Use of Tobacco in the Context of the Wake’ In Ryan, Salvador (ed.). Death and the Irish: A Miscellany. Dublin: Wordwell (In Press).
     
  • (2015) ‘Paganism in Ireland: Syncretic Processes, Identity and a Sense of Place’ In: Rountree, Kathryn (ed). Modern Pagan and Native Faith Movements in Europe: Colonial and Nationalist Impulses. Oxford and Brooklyn, NY: Berghahn Book
     
  • (2015) ‘Magic and Supernatural Themes in Carnivàle’ In: Aloi, Peg and Johnston, Hannah (eds.). Carnivàle and the American Grotesque: Critical Essays on the HBO Series, pp. 73-97. Jefferson, North Carolina, USA: McFarland
     
  • (2012) ‘St. Patrick, Folklore and Irish National Identity’ In: Heimo, Anne; Hovi, Tuomas; Vasenkari, Maria (eds.). Saint Urho – Pyhä Urho – from Fakelore to Folklore, pp. 84-101. Finland: University of Turku
     
  • (2011) ‘Irish Neo-Paganism: Worldview and Identity’ In: Cosgrove, O., Cox, L., Kuhling, C. and Mulholland, P. (eds.). Ireland’s New Religious Movements, pp. 111-130. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
     
  • (2009) ‘Neo-Pagan Celebrations of Samhain’ In: Foley, Malcolm and O’Donnell, Hugh (eds.). Treat or Trick? Halloween in a Globalising World, pp. 67-82. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
     
  • (2008) ‘Symbolic and Social Roles of Women in Death Ritual in Traditional Irish Society’ In: Håland, Evy Johanne (ed). Women, Pain and Death: Rituals and Everyday Life on the Margins of Europe and Beyond, pp. 108-121. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
     
  • (2007) Co-authored with Maria Tighe ‘Holistic Health and New Age in the British Isles’ In: Kemp, Darren and Lewis, James R. (eds.). Handbook of New Age, pp. 415-434. Leiden and Boston: Brill
     
  • (2005) ‘Druidry in Contemporary Ireland’ In: Strmiska, Michael (ed). Modern Paganism in World Cultures: Comparative Perspectives, pp. 87-125. Santa Barbara, California; Denver, Colorado; Oxford, England: ABC-CLIO
     
  • (2004) ‘Neo-Pagan Ritual Practice as Visual Culture and Creative Expression of Identity’ In: Kockel, Ullrich and Nic Craith, Máiréad (eds.). Communicating Cultures, pp. 108-128. New Brunswick, USA and London, UK: LIT Verlag


     
Peer Reviewed Journal Articles
 
  • (2020) 'Contemporary Pagan Pilgrimage: Ritual and Re-Storying in the Irish Landscape'. NVMAN: International Review for the History of Religions 67/5-6 (Sep 2020): 613-636. Special Issue: Reframing Pilgrimage in Northern Europe, edited by Marion Bowman, Dirk Johannsen and Ane Ohrvik.
     
  • (2018) ‘Entering the Magic Mists: Irish Contemporary Paganism, Celticity and Indigeneity’. International Journal for the Study of New Religions (IJSNR) 9:2: 177-194. Special Issue: Indigenizing Movements in Europe, Guest Edited by Graham Harvey
     
  • (2014) ‘Remembrance of the Ancestors in Contemporary Paganism’. The Journal of the Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions (JISASR) 2:1: 94-118
     
  • (2009) ‘The Neo-Pagan Ritual Year and Gender’. Cosmos 25: 191-200
     
  • (2002) ‘The Neo-Pagan Ritual Year’. Cosmos 18: 121-142
 
Other Journal Articles
  • (2011) ‘An Ethnographic Study of Irish Neo-Pagan Culture’, The Boolean 2. http://publish.ucc.ie/boolean/2011/00/Butler/04/en
  • (2003) ‘Ireland’s Sacred Landscape: Neo-Pagan Worldview and the Ritual Utilisation of Sacred Sites’. Béascna UCC Journal of Folklore and Ethnology 2: 29-45

     
Conference Proceedings

 

  • (2008) ‘The Neo-Pagan Ritual Year and Historical Reinterpretations’ In Irina Sedakova (ed.), The Ritual Year and History (Ritual Year 3), Narodní ústav lidové kultury: Stráznice, Czech Republic, pp. 72-78

  • (2007) ‘Midsummer Magic: Neo-Pagan Celebrations of the Summer Solstice’ In Lina Midholm and Annika Nordström (eds.), The Ritual Year and Ritual Diversity. Proceedings (Ritual Year 2), Institutet för språk och folkminnen Dialekt-, ortnemns- och folkminnesarkivet I Göteborg (DAG): Gothenburg, Sweden, pp. 45-50

  • (2004) ‘Expressions of the Sacred in Contemporary Pagan Culture in Ireland’ In Piterskaja, E. S. and Kharitonova V.I. (eds.), Proceedings of the International Interdisciplinary Scientific and Practical Congress Sacral Through the Eyes of the ‘Lay’ and the ‘Initiated’, Moscow, Russia, pp. 162-171

 

Book Reviews

 

  • (2015) Review of Richard Jenkins’ Black Magic and Bogeymen: Fear, Rumour and Popular Belief in the North of Ireland 1972-74 (2014, Cork University Press), Reviews and Critical Commentary, online publication of the Council for European Studies (CES)

  • (2015) Review of Dennis Gaffin’s Running with the Fairies: Towards a Transpersonal Anthropology of Religion (2013, Cambridge Scholars Publishing), Fieldwork in Religion

  • (2013) Review of Kathryn Rountree’s Crafting Contemporary Pagan Identities in a Catholic Society (2010, Ashgate), Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1-2, 299-301

  • (2005) Review of Kathryn Rountree’s Embracing the Witch and the Goddess: Feminist Ritual-Makers in New Zealand (2004, Routledge), Cosmos, Vol. 21, No. 1: June 2005, 127-129

 

Reports

 

  • (2017) Jenny Butler and James Kapaló, 'The Study of Religions in Ireland' in the 'From Our Correspondents' series of the British Association for the Study of Religions (BASR) Bulletin 130/May 2017. BASR, England.

  • (2007) ‘Report on the Conference: Charming and Crafty: Witchcraft and Paganism in Contemporary Media. Harvard University, Cambridge, USA 18-21 May 2006, Journal of Alternative Spiritualities and New Age Studies (JASANAS), Vol. 3. Kempress Ltd: London

 

Encyclopedia Entries
 
  • (2018) 'Healers' in 'Spirituality' section, Entry (1,000 words) In Susan de Gaia (ed.). Encyclopedia of Women in World Religions: Faith and Culture Across History. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, pp. 331-333.

  • (2015) 'Changelings', Entry (800 words) In Laycock, Joseph (ed). Spirit Possession around the World: Possession, Communion, and Demon Expulsion across Cultures. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, pp. 68-71

Publications

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Dr Jenny Butler is a well known folklorist and scholar of religions. She is the leading authority on the academic study of contemporary Paganism in the Irish context, having conducted the first ever ethnographic study of Irish contemporary Paganism. Her book on this topic, 21st Century Irish Paganism: Worldview, Ritual, Identity, is forthcoming from Routledge.

 

Dr Butler has given numerous keynote addresses and over eighty conference presentations and invited talks in Ireland and internationally. She has been the recipient of many awards, bursaries and accolades, and her research has been supported by the Irish Research Council, the Royal Irish Academy, the Ireland-Canada University Foundation, the Ireland-Newfoundland Partnership (Department of the Taoiseach), and by the UCC College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences Research Support Fund. Dr Butler has been a Government of Ireland Research Scholar (2001-2004), a Dobbin Scholar (2010) and a Cha r lemont Scholar (2017).
 


Dr Butler is currently working on a comparative ethnographic project, Fairy Lore & Landscapes, on the otherworld traditions connected to the landscapes of Ireland, Newfoundland in Canada, and Iceland. The project explores the interconnections of worldviews, customs, and sense of place as intangible cultural heritage.
 

Dr Butler is the President of The Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions (ISASR) and an elected member of the Executive Committee (Publications Officer) of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR). She is a Committee Member of the Anthropological Association of Ireland (AAI).

 

Dr Butler founded the research network, the Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism (INSEP), a Regional Network of the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism (ESSWE), of which she is an Officer of the Executive Board. She is a member of the American Academy of Religion (AAR) Pagan Studies Unit Steering Committee.

Dr Jenny Butler is a Lecturer in the Study of Religions Department, University College Cork, where she teaches various courses including 'Myth & Magic: An Introduction to the Study of Irish Folklore and Mythology', 'Western Esotericism and New Religious Movements', 'Folk Religion in a Globalised World', and 'Contemporary Religions in Ireland'.
 

About

Dr Jenny Butler is a well known folklorist and scholar of religions. She is the leading authority on the academic study of contemporary Paganism in the Irish context, having conducted the first ever ethnographic study of Irish contemporary Paganism. Her book on this topic, 21st Century Irish Paganism: Worldview, Ritual, Identity, is forthcoming from Routledge.

 

Dr Butler has given numerous keynote addresses and over eighty conference presentations and invited talks in Ireland and internationally. She has been the recipient of many awards, bursaries and accolades, and her research has been supported by the Irish Research Council, the Royal Irish Academy, the Ireland-Canada University Foundation, the Ireland-Newfoundland Partnership (Department of the Taoiseach), and by the UCC College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences Research Support Fund. Dr Butler has been a Government of Ireland Research Scholar (2001-2004), a Dobbin Scholar (2010) and a Cha r lemont Scholar (2017).
 


Dr Butler is currently working on a comparative ethnographic project, Fairy Lore & Landscapes, on the otherworld traditions connected to the landscapes of Ireland, Newfoundland in Canada, and Iceland. The project explores the interconnections of worldviews, customs, and sense of place as intangible cultural heritage.
 

Dr Butler is the President of The Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions (ISASR) and an elected member of the Executive Committee (Publications Officer) of the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR). She is a Committee Member of the Anthropological Association of Ireland (AAI).

 

Dr Butler founded the research network, the Irish Network for the Study of Esotericism and Paganism (INSEP), a Regional Network of the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism (ESSWE), of which she is an Officer of the Executive Board. She is a member of the American Academy of Religion (AAR) Pagan Studies Unit Steering Committee.

Dr Jenny Butler is a Lecturer in the Study of Religions Department, University College Cork, where she teaches various courses including 'Myth & Magic: An Introduction to the Study of Irish Folklore and Mythology', 'Western Esotericism and New Religious Movements', 'Folk Religion in a Globalised World', and 'Contemporary Religions in Ireland'.
 

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